Category Archives: Quote-ables

Phil’s Faves for February

Reader input suggested it was time for more ‘Phil’s Faves’ – comments you would hear often in one of my presentations or workshops. Thanks for asking …

  1. The only thing worse than a bad workplace meeting is a great meeting that didn’t need to be a meeting. It should have been an email, memo, phone call or face-to-face conversation.
  2. ‘Perception is Reality’ with audiences. All they know is what they see and hear. If you look and sound like you’re comfortable and competent with your presentation, you are.
  3. Project uncommon courtesy with every outgoing phone call by saying these five magic words within the first 10 seconds – ‘Is this a good time?’

And … true to my rant about always identifying the context of people you quote:

Phil Stella, 21st century entrepreneur, communication consultant & executive coach

Gitomer Gets Eloquence

Do you yearn to be more eloquent in your routine workplace communication but aren’t sure what that really means? Well, let one of my favorite authors, Jeffrey Gitomer, help you.  Eloquence is:

  • Delivering your message in terms of the audience.
  • Making sure your message is transferable.
  • Making sure your message is relatable.
  • Customizing and personalizing your message.
  • Enunciating your message.
  • When the audience perceives that you love what you do.

So, that’s a clear description of eloquence, according to one of the best experts in the business. Now … go be eloquent.

Jeffrey Gitomer, 21st century sales cexpert, author and speaker

Naisbitt on Networking

As the self-proclaimed Godfather of Networking’, I’ve often quoted John Naisbitt, author of ‘MegaTrends’ in my articles and presentations. He initially coined the phrase over 35 years ago and his definition still works today in the age of high tech and social media. Funny thing – everything old is new again. So, let’s all learn something old from the master. Read More »

Definition of Success

At the excellent BizConCle last month sponsored by Cleveland’s Council of Smaller Enterprises, one of the main stage speakers asked us all for our definition of success. Mine was short and simple – Do what you love … love what you do … and be good enough at it to support the life you’ve chosen.’

What’s your definition of success?

Even More ‘Stellar Wisdom’

I so appreciate the positive reader reaction about sharing my own ’Quote-ables’ based on over 35 years of workplace communication practitioner experience. Enjoy this month’s trio …

  1. Do what you love and love what you do. All the rest is just details.
  2. Plan your work, then work your plan.
  3. Your customers are not always right, but they are always your Customers. So, take good care of them by meeting their reasonable expectations and make a profit doing it.

And in case someone asks ‘Says who?’ …

Phil Stella, 21st century executive presentation coach, author and professional speaker

More ‘Stellar’ Wisdom

Looks like sharing some of my favorite ‘pearls of wisdom’ in last month’s ‘Quote-ables’ was a hit, based on reader comments. So … here’s another helping from my practitioner perspective: Read More »

‘Stellar’ Wisdom

Readers generally like ‘Quote-ables’ – the pearls of wisdom about communication I share from past generations, famous people and business leaders. But recently, a reader indicated she was also interested in what contemporary communication practitioners … like me … had to say based on our everyday experience. Read More »

20th Century Treasures

We can learn a lot about communicating from those who lived and worked in the 20th century.

‘The great thing about human language is that it prevents us from sticking to the matter at hand.’ John Maynard Keynes (1883 – 1946), British author and influential economist.

‘No one has a finer command of language than the person who keeps his mouth shut.’ Robert Benchley (1889 – 1945), American humorist, columnist and film actor.

‘Do not accustom yourself to use big words for little matters.’ Sam Rayburn (1882 – 1961), American politician and longest-serving Speaker of the House of Representatives.


 

Everything Old Is New Again

What can we learn from the ancients about contemporary communication challenges? Lots!

By words the mind is winged. – Aristophanes, (450 BC – 388 BC) Greek playwright.

An angry man opens his mouth and shuts his eyes. – Cato the Elder (234 BC -149 BC) Roman senator and historian.

Words have a longer life than deeds. – Pindar, (522 BC – 443BC) Greek lyric poet.

The Art of Conversation

Let’s see what some contemporary American experts think about the Art of Conversation:

‘You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.’ – Dale Carnegie, writer, lecturer and self-improvement expert.

‘Most people do not listen with the intent to understand. They listen with the intent to reply.’ – Stephen Covey, educator, author and motivational speaker.

‘The mark of a good conversationalist is not that you can talk a lot. The mark is that you can get others to talk a lot. Thus, good schmoozers are good listeners, not good talkers.’ – Guy Kawasaki, marketing expert, author and Silicon Valley venture capitalist.

Many people may listen, but few people actually hear. – Harvey Mackay, author, business owner and speaker.