Category Archives: Quickies

How Beats How Much

How you practice is often more important than how much. Last month’s ‘Communicate Confidently’ eLetter article on practicing presentations generated several reader questions. Here’s a summary of some of the comments I offered in my email responses:

  • Practicing out loud, standing up, working with the slides is the most productive method. Pretend you’re talking to the audience.

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Masterful Listening

Some masterful Listening Tips from ‘Communicate or Die’:

  • ‘Listen without a point of view. Avoid immediate free-association to your own experience put your tendency to evaluate on hold.

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How much should you practice?

Last month’s ‘Communicate Confidently’ eLetter article on practicing presentations generated several reader questions. Here’s a summary of some of the comments I offered in my email responses:
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Pitch Perfect

My good friend and COSE (Cleveland’s Council of Smaller Enterprises) colleague Diane Helbig helps sales people perfect their pitches. She advises this structure:

  • ‘Short and to the point
  • Begin with a recap of the prospect’s goals and needs (as you heard them)
  • Introduction of the product or service you are presenting
  • Bulleted list of the benefits of that product or service to the prospect (based on the goals and needs you heard)
  • Cost statement
  • Implementation schedule, if appropriate
  • Request for confirmation from the prospect – as how it sounds to them; does it meet their needs as stated.

Sales is all about the prospect – not about you or your product/service.’

‘Lemonade Stand Selling’, Diane Helbig, Sales Gravy Press, 2009.

 

Helbig Really Gets Sales

More from my good friend and COSE (Cleveland’s Council of Smaller Enterprises) colleague Diane Helbig, from her popular book, ‘Lemonade Stand Selling’. Here are some of her thoughts on sales:
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Customer-Centric Communication

Your customers have different preferences about how they prefer to communicate. Some would rather talk than write. Others would rather write than talk. Yet others have very higher response rate to text. No surprises here!
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Time for a Change?

Regular readers know how much I love ranting about not letting the ‘Tech Tail’ wag the ‘Presenter Dog’, so here’s another example. How do you change those wonderful audience-centric speaker support slides you’ve created when you don’t have a remote available?

Answer – you or someone has to manually change them, but avoid those annoying or clumsy habits that can really reduce the positive impression you project on your audience or the impact of your message. Consider these lessons learned from some of the Varsity Presenters I’ve had the pleasure of coaching:
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Can You Hear Me Now?

With most typical workplace presentation situations you’re likely to face, neither the size of the audience nor the size of the room is large enough to need voice amplification. So, simply speak up with your one-to-group energetic volume level and they can hear you fine.

On those rare occasions when you do need a microphone, don’t let the technology tail wag the presenter dog. But do make the most of the technology you have at hand: Read More »

Permission-less Marketing

Here’s an example of a sales person who practiced the opposite of ‘Permission Marketing’; someone I immediately nominated for the ‘Networking Slug Hall of Fame’. I think she got in on the first ballot. Read More »

Get My Point?

A reader just asked me what I thought of using a laser pointer with his slides. I started the conversation with ‘Don’t let the technology tail wag the presenter dog’. The rest of my comments:
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